Tuesday, October 24, 2017

Conference
Fourth Annual ACGS Conference - Amsterdam 26-27 October 2017

Postcolonial Mediations: Globalisation and Displacement

 

Keynote speakers

  • Victoria Bernal (Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine, US)
  • Paula Chakravartty (Associate Professor Media, Culture and Communication, New York University, New York, US)
  • Iain Chambers (Professor of Cultural and Postcolonial Studies, Oriental University, Naples, Italy)

 

Postcolonial Mediations

Postcolonial thinking has challenged the stability of discourses on culture, globalisation, economics, human rights and politics. Postcolonial thinking, as a form of mediation and displacement of worldviews, triggered a re-evaluation of the complex connections between culture, class, economy, gender and sexuality. This conference aims to engage with such postcolonial displacements.

Displacement can be seen under the rubric of mobility and its many forms today, most tellingly discernible in the forced movements of peoples in the wake of wars, and the concomitant crises this provokes around issues of “culture and civilization”, and its gendered, religious and raced dimensions. The refugee crisis in Europe is an important case in point. Cultural productions from the non-West continue to displace received understandings of other cultures and societies (Chow, 2002, Narayan, 1997) while contemporary political movements draw inspiration from postcolonial struggles as they deploy new media forms, as Howard Caygill (2013) has recently shown in his analyses of the Gandhian non-violence movement, the continuing Maoist rebellions and their relation to the Zapatistas and the Indignados. The shifting contours of gender and sexual politics, and the critique of stable identities provoked by queer politics and theory, are also producing displacements, in the discourse and practice of the politics of rights. Local, regional and national politics often challenge universal rights claims. e.g. the controversies around the relevance of “Global Queer” (Altman, 1996).

The postcolonial is understood here simultaneously as a mediating and a displacing series of interventions, which demands engagement with contemporary understandings of globalisation.

for more information about the programme see here

Organisers

Sudeep Dasgupta (University of Amsterdam), John Nguyet Erni (Hong Kong Baptist University), Aniko Imre (University of Southern California), Jeroen de Kloet (University of Amsterdam), Sandra Ponzanesi (Utrecht University), Raka Shome (National University of Singapore)

Location

University Theatre

Nieuwe Doelenstraat 16-18 | 1012 CP Amsterdam
+31 (0)20 525 2997

Thursday, September 28, 2017

PCI Screening/talk: Tabita Rezaire - Decolonial trinity: technologies of the spiritual, erotic and politic


In this PCI screening/talk on October 5 we have the great honor and privilege to have with us the artist Tabita Rezaire, who will introduce, show and discuss her video work for an hour, followed by a 30 minutes Q&A session. We end with drinks.

The session is titled Decolonial trinity: technologies of the spiritual, erotic and politic.

This event is co-organized by Koen Leurs and Domitilla Olivieri from the Graduate Gender Programme / Netherlands Research School ofGender Studies with Michiel De Lange from the New Media & Digital culture Program, under heading of the the Postcolonial Studies Initiative and Co.laborations, the Expertise Centre of Utrecht University's Department of Media and Culture, and in dialogue with the Impakt festival.

Kindly RSVP to this Facebook event to let us know you are coming.

Practical information:
Thursday October 5, 17.00-18.30.
Location:
theaterzaal, Parnassos
Kruisstraat 201
3581 GK Utrecht

Biography
Tabita Rezaire (b.1989, Paris) is a French - of Guyanese and Danish descent - video artist, health-tech-politics practitioner and Kemetic/ Kundalini Yoga teacher based in Johannesburg. She holds a Bachelor in Economics (Paris) and a Master in Artist Moving Image from Central Saint Martins College (London). Rezaire’s practices unearth the possibilities of decolonial healing through the politics of technology. Navigating architectures of power - online and offline - her work tackles the pervasive matrix of coloniality and its affects on identity, technology, sexuality, health and spirituality. Through screen interfaces, her digital healing activism offers substitute readings to dominant narratives decentering occidental authority, while her energy streams remind us to resist, (re)connect, and remember.

Rezaire is a founding member of the artist group NTU, half of the duo Malaxa, and mother of the energy house SENEB.
In 2017, she presented her first solo show Exotic Trade at the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg. Artsy declared her among the ‘emerging artists to watch for in 2017’, Artnet among the ‘international Black artists of 2016’, and True Africa amid the ‘top opinion makers of the African continent in 2015’. Rezaire has shown her work internationally – V&A London, National Gallery of Denmark, Berlin Biennale, Tate Modern London, Museum of Modern Art Paris, MoCADA NY, The Broad LA and presented her work on numerous panels – Het Nieuwe Institut Rotterdam, Royal Academy The Hague, Kunsthalle Bern, National Gallery Harare, Cairotronica Cairo, Fakugezi Digital Art Africa Johannesburg. She has curated screenings at the Institute of Contemporary Art London, led spiritual technology workshops worldwide and has her writing published by Intellect books.
 In 2016, Tabita was a resident at the Utrecht Impakt festival, see http://impakt.nl/headquarters/resident-artist-tabita-rezaire/

Rezaire lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa. See http://tabitarezaire.com/info.html

Wednesday, May 3, 2017

Professor Roderick A. Ferguson and Dr. Rahul Rao in a Doing Gender and PCI Lecture Series

Roderick A. Ferguson (University of Illinois at Chicago, USA): ‘Queer of Color Critique and the Engagement with Western Marxism’
This presentation will address the effort to fashion queer of color critique as a different version of historical materialism. In this sense, queer of color critique both located itself within historical materialism and attempted to reshape historical materialism, making what Althusser described as “the science of social formation” into an intersectional analysis of race, gender, sexuality, and political economy. As such, queer of color critique would be presented as both an engagement with and an eschewal of Western Marxism. The talk will attempt to demonstrate this intent by revisiting Aberrations in Black and publications by other authors and critics who have helped to produce a materialist shift in the field of queer studies.

Rahul Rao (SOAS University London, UK): ‘Queer in the Time of Homocapitalism’
In recent years, leading institutions of global capitalism have begun to take activist stances against homophobia. For example, in response to Uganda’s passage of an Anti Homosexuality Act, the World Bank withheld a $90 million loan that was due to have been disbursed to the country. Like a number of multinational corporations, the Bank has also become invested in quantifying the “economic cost” of homophobia so as to make a “business case” for LGBT rights. Why have these institutions begun to inveigh against homophobia and why have they done so now? What are the terms on which the figure of the queer has come to be embraced as an object of concern by the global development industry and as a potential “stakeholder” by the business world? What understandings of “homophobia” underpin the putative “business case” against it? In addressing these questions, I shall attempt to offer a political economy of “homophobia” as it expresses itself in contemporary Uganda; in doing so, I hope to make visible the implication of the Bank in the production of the very affects that it now purports to oppose.

Practical information:
Date: May 18, 2017
Time: 11.00 – 12.30 hrs
Location: Drift 25, room 1.02
Chair: Rosemarie Buikema & Gianmaria Colpani
Registration via email is compulsory.

More information here.